Appliance Repair Tips


If you are technologically inclined, you may be able to diagnose and repair your own appliances. This will save you money. We are presenting some useful tips for appliance repair for your benefit. We hope that these tips will help you. If you have any suggestions, please send us an email, if appropriate, we will incorporate your suggestions in our website.

Please note that you must take extra safety precaution when you handle any electrical machines. You are responsible for your safety.

If you need help, please call 512-919-9924. Thank
you very much.

 

Tips for Dish Washer Problems:

Tips for Dryer Problems:

Tips for Microwave Problems:

Tips for Oven Problems:

Tips for Refrigerator Problems:

Tips for Cloth Washer Problems:

Dishwasher does not drain

  1. Air gap / Drain hosesIf there is an air gap (located in the sink, near the faucet), check to see if it is clogged. Unscrew the top cap and see if there is anything blocking inside. Note: If there is no air gap installed, the dishwasher might not drain properly.If the drain hose is clogged, the dishwasher would not drain. If there is an air gap installed, it is very common that a hose going from the air gap into the garbage disposer is clogged. Remove and clean the hose. Make sure to reattach the hose before starting the dishwasher.Note: If you recently had a garbage disposer installed, it is common to overlook removing the drain plug.
  2. Broken beltSome dishwasher models use a belt to drive the pump. Replace the belt if found broken.Note: Sometimes the belt would just come off the pump. Even though it might not be broken, it is recommended that you replace the belt, because it is probably too stretched out.
  3. Drain solenoidSome models (for example most GE dishwashers) use a drain solenoid to drain water out. Sometimes the solenoid gets stuck, preventing the water from draining out. Try to free up the solenoid. If unsuccessful, you might have to replace the pump assembly.
  4. MotorIf the motor is stuck, it is sometimes possible to free it up by manually spinning the motor.Replace the motor if defective.
  5. PumpSome models have two impellers inside the pump – one, wash impeller, takes care of the wash cycles, the other, drain impeller, drains the water out. If the drain impeller is broken (broken blades, shaft), the dishwasher would not drain. Replace any broken pump components.
  6. TimerReplace if defective (note: uncommon problem).

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No water to dishwasher

Make sure you get water to the dishwasher. Check to see if the water shut-off valve (located under the sink) is open. If you get water to the dishwasher, but there is still no water inside during the fill cycle, the problem might be with a faulty water valve (located at the bottom of the dishwasher, behind the kick panel, on either side), in which case replace the water valve.

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Dishwasher dont clean dishes

  1. No waterMake sure you get water to the dishwasher. Check to see if the water shut-off valve (located under the sink) is open. If you get water to the dishwasher, but there is still no water inside during the fill cycle, the problem might be with a faulty water valve (located at the bottom of the dishwasher, behind the kick panel, on either side), in which case replace the water valve.
  2. Not enough waterIf there is not enough water, the dishes would not get cleaned. This could be caused by a partially closed water shut-off valve (located under the sink), or a faulty dishwasher water valve (located at the bottom of the dishwasher, behind the kick panel, on either side).
  3. Clogged spay armsThere is usually two, sometimes three spray arms in a dishwasher. Make sure there is no debris blocking the holes inside each spray arm.
  4. Water temperature is too lowTo get the best results, the water has to be at 120 degrees Fahrenheit when entering the dishwasher.
  5. Not enough soapIf you only fill one part of the soap cup, try adding soap to both parts.
  6. Smoky film on dishes and glassesThis problem occurs due to excessive calcium build up inside the dishwasher. Try cleaning you dishwasher using a dishwasher cleaner. There are a few out there, we recommend Dishwasher Magic®.

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Gas dryer is not working, there is no heat

  1. Gas valve coilsIgniter glows, then shuts off without igniting gas – the problem is probably with defective coils (black, located on top of the gas valve). It is recommended to replace all coils (usually two or three) if found defective.Note: Sometimes the whole gas valve may be defective, thus not letting the gas out. However, this problem is not common.
  2. Thermal fuseMost dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.Note: It is recommended by most dryer manufacturers to replace a hi-limit thermostat when replacing a thermal fuse.
  3. IgniterIgniter may burn out or break. Replace the igniter if found defective.Note: Igniters are very fragile and break easily. It is recommended to handle the igniter only touching the ceramic part of it (usually white in color).
  4. Flame sensor (or radiant heat sensor)Replace the sensor (located near the igniter) if found defective.

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Dryer takes too long to dry clothes

  1. VentingMake sure the dryer vent hose, as well as the rest of the vent duct, is not clogged.Unless regular maintenance is performed, chances are there is a lot of lint accumulated inside the dryer. This might affect the drying time and could be a fire hazard. Make sure to have your dryer cleaned regularly. Because this might involve taking most of the dryer apart, it is recommended to have a qualified appliance repairman perform this task.
  2. ThermostatThere are a couple of cycling thermostats inside the dryer. If one of them breaks down, it might affect the dryer’s performance. Replace the defective thermostat.

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Dryer does not run

  1. No power to the dryerMake sure there’s power getting to the dryer. Check for a tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse. Check the wall socket for power with a voltmeter or by plugging something else in.
  2. Door switch / Door switch actuator leverThe dryer would not start with a broken door switch. Replace the door switch if found defective.Most dryers have a door switch actuator lever – when you close a dryer door, it presses against the lever, which actuates the door switch. If the lever is broken, the switch would not activate and the dryer would not start. Replace the lever, if broken.Note: Door switch actuator lever usually comes with the door switch assembly and it is recommended to get the whole assembly since there is almost no price difference between the door switch assembly and just the lever. Check your model for more details.
  3. Thermal fuseMost dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.Note: It is recommended by most dryer manufacturers to replace a hi-limit thermostat when replacing a thermal fuse.
  4. TimerReplace if defective (note: uncommon problem).

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Microwave is not working

If your microwave oven doesn’t seem to work at all, check these:

Fuses

Door switch

Fuses

Usually, when your microwave oven doesn’t work it all, the internal fuse (thermal fuse) is blown. This fuse protects both you and the oven. When it blows, you need to have a qualified appliance repair technician replace it.

Door switch

If the fuse isn’t the problem, check the door hooks and the door-release button. When these are broken, the door switch doesn’t activate, so the oven can’t work.

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Microwave sounds normal, but there’s no heat

When the microwave sounds okay, but there’s no heat, one of the internal door switches, the high voltage circuitry, or the circuit board may have a problem. To resolve this problem, you need the assistance of a qualified appliance repair technician.

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I can’t adjust the power level in my microwave

When you can’t adjust the power level, there’s probably a defective triac (a type of electronic voltage control) or a problem on one of the circuit boards. You need to have a qualified appliance repair technician diagnose and repair your microwave.

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The carousel in my microwave does not turn

Although the carousel is usually driven by a small motor that’s unrelated to the heating function of the microwave, the microwave cabinet needs to be opened to repair it. So we recommend that you seek the assistance of a qualified appliance repair technician. Inspect the plastic drive coupling that the tray sits on, as well as the ring-and-roller assembly, to make sure that they’re working properly.

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I have intermittent cooking problems in my microwave

Many over-the-range microwave ovens suffer from intermittent problems caused by excessive moisture from the range/stove entering the microwave cabinet and collecting on the circuitry. Often the problem is with one or two simple connections that may need tightening or soldering. But, to repair these components, the microwave cabinet needs to be opened. So we recommend that you seek the assistance of a qualified appliance repair technician.

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The display flickers in my microwave

If the display flickers mildly and doesn’t affect the way the microwave works, don’t worry about it. However, if the flickering is severe and coincides with cooking problems, you need to pursue a solution. Because repairing this component requires opening of the microwave cabinet, we recommend that you seek the assistance of a qualified appliance repair technician.

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There’s no heat in my microwave, but it buzzes loudly

When the microwave won’t heat, but you hear a loud buzz, you usually have a defective power diode, high-voltage capacitor, or magnetron. We recommend that you consult with a qualified appliance repair technician for help in determining the problem and deciding what to do about it.

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My microwave quit working after I slammed the door

When you slammed the door, you may have blown a fuse. See It doesn’t work at all.

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It appears there is lightning (arcing) inside my microwave

When you see arcing inside your microwave, it’s because of food or liquid left in the cavity or on the wave-guide cover:

  • If the wave guide has any burn spots, replace it and clean the unit well.
  • If the cavity has any burn spots, spot-sand it smooth and touch it up with microwave interior paint.

Note… If there are any burn holes in the cavity, don’t use the unit-seek help from a qualified appliance repair technician.

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Electric oven is not working

No power

Make sure there’s power getting to your range, oven or cooktop. Check for a tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse. Check the wall socket for power with a voltmeter. Sometimes the power cord disconnects or burns at the appliance, if this is the case, the wiring and the terminal block must be repaired or replaced.

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Top element doesn’t work in my electric oven

  1. Top elementIf the element only works partially or not getting red hot at the “Hi” setting, the problem might be with a burned out receptacle that the element plugs into. If this is the case, replace both the element and the receptacle.You can usually tell when the element itself burns out. It might have small holes or bubbles on the coil. Replace the element, if found defective.
  2. Infinite switchAnother reason, why the element would not start, might be a defective infinite switch (located behind the control panel, with the burner knob on its shaft). Replace the switch if found defective.

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My electric oven doesn’t bake

Bake element

Replace if found defective

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My electric oven doesn’t broil

Broil element

Replace if found defective

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My gas oven doesn’t work at all

No power

Make sure there’s power getting to your range, oven or cooktop. Check for a tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse. Check the wall socket for power with a voltmeter or by plugging something else in.

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Top burner doesn’t work in my gas oven

A lot of times the problem is with a dirty or a clogged burner. Make sure the burner is clean.

If you have a pilotless model, it uses a spark igniter to ignite the gas, which works in a combination with a spark switch (located on the burner gas valve) and a spark module. Because it is not simple to test these parts and find out which one is defective, we recommend to contact a professional appliance technician.

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My gas oven doesn’t bake

Bake igniter

When the bake igniter becomes weak or burns out, your oven would not bake. The bake igniter is usually mounted on the oven burner. It’s about 1 inch by 4-8 inches (depending on the model), and comes in round or flat styles. If you don’t see the igniter glow at all, it’s probably burned out. Replace the igniter if found defective. Note: one of the exceptions could be that your oven is set to automatic mode instead of manual. If this is the case, set your oven to manual mode and check again.

If the bake igniter glows red and not bright yellow or white, it is probably because it is too weak. When this happens, the safety valve would not let the gas out into the oven burner. A weak igniter must be replaced.

A faulty igniter is probably the most common cause, however there are others:

  • defective thermostat
  • defective selector switch
  • defective gas safety valve

If you are certain the igniter is ok, it might be a good idea to call a professional appliance technician.

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Regrigerator stopped completely

First, check to see if the light comes on or if there is any fan, motor, or other sound coming from the appliance? If so, the refrigerator isn’t really completely stopped–go to the specific problem you are having. If not, try adjusting the thermostat to a colder setting. If that doesn’t work, read on.

Second, check to see if there is power getting to the refrigerator. To do that, plug a lamp or other device into the same outlet the refrigerator is plugged into. If there’s no power, check the fuses or circuit breakers. If the fuses or breakers aren’t the problem, contact a qualified electrician to restore power to the outlet.

If there is power to the appliance but it still seems to be stopped, there may be a problem in one or more of these:

  • Wiring
  • Thermostat
  • Defrost timer
  • Compressor
  • Overload and/or relay

Unfortunately, we can’t describe all of the possible problems and repair solutions here. If you are unable to troubleshoot the problem from here, you may need to contact a qualified appliance repair technician.

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My Refrigerator is not cold

If the refrigerator isn’t cool, you need to answer some questions, then see if the compressor is running.

First, answer these questions:

  • Is the refrigerator completely dead? If so, see “It’s stopped completely.”
  • Is the thermostat knob turned to the proper setting? If not, reset it.
  • Next, see if the compressor motor is running

The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. It’s on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. If it is humming or making a continuous noise and your refrigerator is still not cooling, there may be a more serious problem with one or more of several different components, we recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair technician for further help.

If the compressor is not running but you do have power to the refrigerator, there may be a problem with one or more of these:

  • The compressor
  • The Thermostat
  • The overload, relay, or capacitor
  • The defrost timer
  • The condenser fan motor

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Cooling is poor in my refrigerator

For an overall understanding of how refrigerators should work, read about refrigerators in the How Things Work section of our website. A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

  • Evaporator coils
  • Condenser

Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils

Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can’t see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can’t draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here’s an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost “manually.” When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

  • The defrost timer
  • The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)
  • The defrost heater

If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem.

Condenser

Self-defrosting refrigerators all have a set of coils and a cooling fan, usually under the refrigerator, that need to be cleaned regularly. If these coils get coated with dust, dirt or lint, the refrigerator may not cool properly. The coils may appear to be a thin, black, wide radiator-like device behind the lower kick-panel. To clean them, disconnect the refrigerator from the power source, use a refrigerator condenser brush (see the Appliance Accessories section) and your vacuum cleaner to clean the coils of any lint, pet hair, etc. You may not be able to get to all of the condenser from the front, it may be necessary to clean the remainder of the condenser from the rear of the refrigerator.

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My refrigerator is noisy

Noise can come from these areas:

  • The inside of the freezer
  • The outside back of the refrigerator
  • The bottom of the refrigerator

The inside of the freezer

Self-defrosting refrigerators use a circulating fan to move the air through the freezer and refrigerator compartments. This fan runs whenever the unit is cooling. The fan is located in the freezer, as follows:

  • If the freezer is on top, the fan is on the back wall, near the top or bottom, in the center of the freezer.
  • If the freezer is on the bottom, the fan is on the back wall, near the top of the freezer.
  • If the freezer is on the left, the fan is on the back wall, halfway up or near the top.

Over time, the fan may become noisy–usually making a chirping or squealing sound, though it may make a loud groaning noise instead.
To find out if the fan is causing the noise, just open the freezer door and push in any fan/light switches. If the noise is louder when the door is open, the evaporator fan motor is the cause. You can’t lubricate or repair this motor. You must replace it.

The outside back of the refrigerator

There are three components on the outside back of the refrigerator that may become noisy: the compressor, the condenser fan motor (if self-defrosting), or the defrost timer (if self-defrosting).

The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. You can see it on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. It is usually black and has black or copper-colored tubes and various colored wires attached to it. If the compressor is the device making noise, there is probably no repair that will reduce the noise. You will have to replace it–which can be quite costly.

If the condenser fan is making noise, there may be a build-up of lint or other debris on the fan blade. The fan is located near the back of the machine, sometimes behind a thin panel. To clean it, first unplug the refrigerator, remove the thin panel, and use a soft bristle brush to clean it. If there is no lint build-up or debris on the blade, you will have to replace the motor.

The defrost timer is often located at the bottom of the refrigerator, near the front and behind the kick plate. Occasionally the electric motor inside the timer may become noisy. The timer must be replaced to solve this problem.

The bottom of the refrigerator

Noises detected at the bottom of the refrigerator almost always originate from the back of the refrigerator. However, sometimes the drain pan under the refrigerator will rattle. You may need to tape the pan in place to stop a rattle. Also see the “Outside back of the refrigerator.”

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My refrigerator leaks

Water can leak from these areas:

  • The bottom front of the refrigerator or freezer door
  • The back of the refrigerator
  • The inside ceiling of the refrigerator
  • The inside back wall of the refrigerator
  • Underneath the front of the refrigerator

The bottom front of the refrigerator or freezer door

Self-defrosting refrigerators usually dispose of the water generated during the defrost cycle via a tube or channel that directs the water to a pan at the bottom of the refrigerator. From the pan, the water normally evaporates. (See a more detailed explanation of this in the How Things Work section of our website).

If the tube or channel is clogged or obstructed, the water backs up and leaks into the inside of the refrigerator compartment. Then the water builds up at the bottom, inside of the refrigerator. When the water has built up for a time it may spill out of the front of the door opening. To fix this problem, clear the drain tube or channel and allow the defrost water to flow down to the drain pan.

In some refrigerators, the defrost water is intentionally directed down the back wall of the refrigerator, where it then flows to the bottom of the refrigerator compartment and out to a small drain–usually located beneath one of the drawers at the bottom of the refrigerator. If the drain becomes clogged or blocked, the water may back up. To fix this problem, clear the obstruction.

Another cause may be the following. The refrigerator may have doorframe heaters to evaporate any condensation on the cabinet frame. If your refrigerator is equipped with a switch inside that says “energy saver” or something similar, while running in that mode the door heaters are disabled. Turn the switch to the opposite setting and wait 24 hours. If the condensation disappears the problem is solved.

The back of the refrigerator

Water coming from the back of the refrigerator usually comes from either the ice maker water valve or line (if there is an ice maker), or from the defrost drain pan.

Here’s what to do:

  • If the water is coming from the ice maker water valve, check to make sure the water tubes are attached properly and are fastened tightly.
  • If the water seems to be coming from any part of the valve itself, replace the valve.
  • If the water appears to be coming from the defrost drain pan, inspect for holes or cracks, and replace the pan if necessary.

The inside ceiling of the refrigerator

Water accumulating on the ceiling of the refrigerator is usually caused by a clogged drain in the freezer section beneath the evaporator. The clogged drain will cause water from the self defrost cycle to leak into the divider between the freezer and refrigerator. This water may then freeze and cause condensation build-up on the refrigerator ceiling. The solution to this problem begins with unclogging the drain. It may also be necessary to remove the entire freezer/refrigerator divider to thoroughly dry the insulation in the divider. Occasionally the insulation needs to be replaced to prevent a recurrence of the problem. This can be a big job – you may want to hire a qualified appliance repair technician.

The inside back wall of the refrigerator

In some refrigerators, the water from the defrost cycle is intentionally directed down the back wall of the refrigerator, where it then flows to the bottom of the refrigerator compartment and out to a small drain – usually located beneath one of the drawers at the bottom of the refrigerator. If the drain becomes clogged or blocked, the water may back up. To fix this problem, clear the obstruction.

Underneath the front of the refrigerator

If the refrigerator is equipped with a water dispenser on the freezer door, check if the water line to the dispenser is leaking. Also, check the drip pan to be sure it isn’t out of place, broken or cracked.

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The freezer compartment is icing up

See the “Cooling is poor” section above.

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The food in the refrigerator freezes

This is a common problem that often doesn’t have a clear, permanent solution. The first thing to check is the overall internal refrigerator temperature (see the Appliance Accessories section for a refrigerator/freezer thermometer). The proper temperature should be between 35 and 42 degrees. Here are some things to try:

  • If your refrigerator temperature is closer to 35 degrees, try turning the temperature up slightly.
  • If you find that the temperature varies a lot from the top shelf to the bottom (where it is coldest), try putting produce and other sensitive products on a higher shelf.
  • If the temperature is too low and you can’t make it warmer by adjusting the thermostat, you probably have a defective thermostat. If so, you need to replace it, because they cannot be repaired. Other possible problems are a leak in the sealed (refrigerant) system, cold air migration (in side-by-side models) or a defective air damper. These problems can be quite difficult to locate and correct, we recommend you contact a qualified appliance repair technician.

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Water is dripping inside the refrigerator

Self-defrosting refrigerators dispose of the water generated during the defrost cycle, usually via a tube or channel that directs the water to a pan at the bottom of the refrigerator. From the pan, the water normally evaporates. (See a more detailed explanation of this in the How Things Work section of our website).

If the tube or channel is clogged or obstructed, the water backs up and leaks into the inside of the refrigerator compartment. Then the water builds up at the bottom, inside of the refrigerator. When the water has built up for a time it may spill out of the front of the door opening. To fix this problem, clear the drain tube or channel and allow the defrost water to flow down to the drain pan.

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The refrigerator never cycles off

The thermostat cycles the refrigerator on and off. The refrigerator normally runs as long as the temperature inside the refrigerator is higher than the set temperature. If the temperature inside the refrigerator is cold enough and the thermostat still does not cycle off, the thermostat may be defective. If so, you need to replace it, because it cannot be repaired. If the thermostat is not defective, you may have a problem with the sealed (refrigerant) system, in which case you should contact a qualified appliance repair technician.

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The ice maker has a problem

The ice maker is a separate appliance within the freezer section. Please see the How things Work section of our website to learn about the normal functioning of ice makers. Some common problems with ice makers are:

  • The ice maker has completely stopped producing ice
  • The ice maker is producing ice poorly
  • The ice maker has completely stopped producing ice

The ice maker has completely stopped producing ice

Check to see whether the ice maker has been turned off. Here’s how to check. Look for a wire along the right side of the ice maker that looks a bit like a coat hanger. If this wire is in the raised position, the ice maker is turned off. On some units you simply lower the wire to the down position to turn the ice maker on. On others, you lower a small red plastic lever to lower the wire. If the wire is in the proper position check the freezer temperature, it should be between 0-8 degrees Fahranheit. If it is warmer than 10-12 degrees, the ice maker may not produce any ice. Check your door seals and thermostat, repair/replace as necessary.

The ice maker is producing ice poorly

When an ice maker is producing ice poorly–when it produces just a few cubes or none, or when the cubes are too small–it’s usually because of a clogged water line or a defective water inlet valve.
First, check the water line attached to the back of the refrigerator for good water flow. To do that, first turn off the water supply valve. Then remove the water line from the back of the refrigerator. Next, place the water line into a bucket and momentarily turn the water valve back on to test the flow. If the flow is poor, you need to repair, clean, or replace the tubing or the shut-off valve that supplies the water. If the flow is good, you may have to replace the water inlet valve.

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There is ice and water dispensing problem in my refrigerator

The ice and water-dispensing system of your refrigerator is quite complex. Many components work together to provide the ice and water. Aside from a simple problem of a leaky water tube or a jammed ice chute, most other components are not user serviceable. We suggest that you contact a qualified appliance repair technician for such repairs.

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What is the Correct Refrigerator Temperature?

The proper refrigerator temperature is usually set by a national authority. Then local authorities can set a lower temperature requirement. Some chains set even a stricter requirement.

The United States Food and Drug Administration set the maximum refrigerator temperature at 41 Degrees Fahrenheit.

That temperature is the maximum for the actual product being refrigerated. This is often confused for the air temperature. The air temperature may fluctuate but the product temperature must remain at 41 or lower.

The colder the product, the longer it will last. That makes 38 Degrees a more optimum temperature. A unit set at 38 Degrees might come on at 38 Degrees and shut off at 35 Degrees. Temperatures below 35 Degrees require a forced defrost cycle.

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My cloth washer doesn’t work at all

  1. No power to the washerMake sure there’s power getting to the washer. Check for a tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse. Check the wall socket for power. Sometimes the power cord disconnects at the washer, if this is the case, the wiring must be repaired or replaced.
  2. Lid switchThe washing machine may not function if the lid switch is defective. The switch is usually located near the door. Replace if found defective.

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My cloth washer fills and drains at the same time

The drain hose might be too low. Make sure the drain hose is at least three feet above the floor.

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My cloth washer doesn’t drain

  1. Clogged drain line or water pumpCheck to see if there’s something stuck inside the pump or the drain hose connected to the pump (pump is usually located at the bottom and towards the back of the washing machine).
  2. Water PumpIf the drain line isn’t clogged, you may have a problem with the water pump such as a frozen pulley or a broken impeller. If that’s the case replace the water pump. Note: if you have a belt driven washer, check the belt(s) for cracks, as this would be a perfect time to replace the belt(s) if needed.

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My cloth washer does not get hot water

Make sure the hot water is turned on.

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My cloth washer does not get cold water

Make sure the cold water is turned on.

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There is no water at all in my cloth washer

First, make sure there’s water getting to the washing machine. If water Inlet Valve is defective, replace it.

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